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A new screening test that tracks changing levels of a protein in the blood can detect twice as many ovarian cancers as conventional methods, research has shown. The technique relies on a statistical calculation to interpret variations in the level of a protein called CA125 which is linked to ovarian…
A £300,000 research study into how personalised physical activity could improve the lives of people with dementia living in care homes has been launched this week. The three-year programme will be led by Professor Alison Bowes from the University of Stirling’s, Dementia Services Development Centre (DSDC), and is funded by…
Professional jobs that challenge the brain may provide the best protection against mental decline in old age, research suggests. Memory and thinking ability is better preserved by solving problems, developing strategy, conflict resolution and information processing than less demanding work, a study has found. Scientists regularly tested 1,054 people over…
The first study to explore African women’s attitudes to female genital mutilation (FGM) reveals that more than half the women interviewed view FGM as abuse. Out of 55 women interviewed from African diaspora communities in Portsmouth and Southampton, 60 per cent opposed the practice, which involves the removal by force…
A high-profile piece of research recently suggested that the sons and brothers of convicted sex offenders are more likely to be convicted of sex crimes than others. The implication is that the potential for committing a sex offence may be written in our genes. But while this is an interesting…
A prostate cancer treatment using permanently implanted radioactive "seeds" doubles rates of five-year tumour-free survival compared with conventional high-dose radiotherapy, a study has found. Low-dose-rate prostate Brachytherapy (LDR-PB) involves the insertion of tiny radioactive implants into the prostate gland which are not removed. A new trial comparing the treatment with…
With Caribbean people in the UK nine times more likely than white British counterparts to be diagnosed with schizophrenia, a University of Manchester mental health researcher has visited Jamaica and Barbados to find out what lessons can be learned. Dr Dawn Edge was funded by a Winston Churchill Memorial Trust…
Introducing video games as a means of bringing older adults in long-term care together may not always be an easy task, according to new research. Previous studies have shown the positive effects of motion-based video games, such as those available on the Nintendo Wii or Microsoft Kinect systems, on the…
Scientists have found a protein they believe can help boost immunity to cancer and viruses. Researchers from Imperial College London say the discovery could open the door to new therapies. The discovery surprised them as until now the new protein had no known function, and did not resemble any other…
Children in Glasgow can become socialised into the city’s gang culture from as young as 12 years old, according to new research by University of the West of Scotland (UWS). UWS PhD student, Johanne Miller told the British Sociological Association’s annual conference in Glasgow on 15 April 2015 about the…
Dementia care for south Asian people could be improved after researchers from The University of Manchester adapted a commonly used tool for judging perceptions of the disease. Several studies have shown that some south Asians show limited knowledge of the causes, symptoms and consequences of dementia, which can lead to…
People with depression have a 83% greater risk of developing dementia, a study has suggested. Those with both depression and type 2 diabetes had a 117% higher risk, the research carried out in the United States found, while those with type 2 diabetes alone had a 20% greater chance. A…